Music, News, Quotes, Random
Music, News, Quotes, Random
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becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
becca-morley:

best reactions to the government shut-down
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sagansense:

Albert Einstein, Civil Rights activistHere’s something you probably don’t know about Albert Einstein. In 1946, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist traveled to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, the alma mater of Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall and the first school in America to grant college degrees to blacks. At Lincoln, Einstein gave a speech in which he called racism “a disease of white people,” and added, “I do not intend to be quiet about it.” He also received an honorary degree and gave a lecture on relativity to Lincoln students.
The reason Einstein’s visit to Lincoln is not better known is that it was virtually ignored by the mainstream press, which regularly covered Einstein’s speeches and activities. (Only the black press gave extensive coverage to the event.) Nor is there mention of the Lincoln visit in any of the major Einstein biographies or archives.
In fact, many significant details are missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans.
That these omissions need to be recognized and corrected is the contention of Fred Jerome and Rodger Taylor, authors of “Einstein on Race and Racism” (Rutgers University Press, 2006). Jerome and Taylor spoke April 3 at an event sponsored by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. The event also featured remarks by Sylvester James Gates Jr., the John S. Toll Professor of Physics, University of Maryland.
According to Jerome and Taylor, Einstein’s statements at Lincoln were by no means an isolated case. Einstein, who was Jewish, was sensitized to racism by the years of Nazi-inspired threats and harassment he suffered during his tenure at the University of Berlin. Einstein was in the United States when the Nazis came to power in 1933, and, fearful that a return to Germany would place him in mortal danger, he decided to stay, accepting a position at the recently founded Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. He became an American citizen in 1940.
But while Einstein may have been grateful to have found a safe haven, his gratitude did not prevent him from criticizing the ethical shortcomings of his new home.
“Einstein realized that African Americans in Princeton were treated like Jews in Germany,” said Taylor. “The town was strictly segregated. There was no high school that blacks could go to until the 1940s.”
Einstein’s response to the racism and segregation he found in Princeton (Paul Robeson, who was born in Princeton, called it “the northernmost town in the South”) was to cultivate relationships in the town’s African-American community. Jerome and Taylor interviewed members of that community who still remember the white-haired, disheveled figure of Einstein strolling through their streets, stopping to chat with the inhabitants, and handing out candy to local children.
One woman remembered that Einstein paid the college tuition of a young man from the community. Another said that he invited Marian Anderson to stay at his home when the singer was refused a room at the Nassau Inn.
Einstein met Paul Robeson when the famous singer and actor came to perform at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre in 1935. The two found they had much in common. Both were concerned about the rise of fascism, and both gave their support to efforts to defend the democratically elected government of Spain against the fascist forces of Francisco Franco. Einstein and Robeson also worked together on the American Crusade to End Lynching, in response to an upsurge in racial murders as black soldiers returned home in the aftermath of World War II.
The 20-year friendship between Einstein and Robeson is another story that has not been told, Jerome said, but that omission may soon be rectified. A movie is in the works about the relationship, with Danny Glover slated to play Robeson and Ben Kingsley as Einstein.
Einstein continued to support progressive causes through the 1950s, when the pressure of anti-Communist witch hunts made it dangerous to do so. Another example of Einstein using his prestige to help a prominent African American occurred in 1951, when the 83-year-old W.E.B. Du Bois, a founder of the NAACP, was indicted by the federal government for failing to register as a “foreign agent” as a consequence of circulating the pro-Soviet Stockholm Peace Petition. Einstein offered to appear as a character witness for Du Bois, which convinced the judge to drop the case.
Gates, an African-American physicist who has appeared on the PBS show Nova, said that Einstein had been a hero of his since he learned about the theory of relativity as a teenager, but that he was unaware of Einstein’s ideas on civil rights until fairly recently.
Einstein’s approach to problems in physics was to begin by asking very simple, almost childlike questions, such as, “What would the world look like if I could drive along a beam of light?” Gates said.
“He must have developed his ideas about race through a similar process. He was capable of asking the question, ‘What would my life be like if I were black?’”
Gates said that thinking about Einstein’s involvement with civil rights has prompted him to speculate on the value of affirmative action and the goal of diversity it seeks to bring about. There are many instances in which the presence of strength and resilience in a system can be attributed to diversity.
“In the natural world, for example, when a population is under the influence of a stressful environment, diversity ensures its survival,” Gates said.
On a cultural level, the global influence of American popular music might be attributed to the fact that it is an amalgam of musical traditions from Europe and Africa.
These examples have led him to conclude that “diversity actually matters, independent of the moral argument.” Gates said he believes “there is a science of diversity out there waiting for scholars to discover it.”
via Harvard Gazette
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kickingshoes:

rawlivingfoods:

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.
“This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.
The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.
Read More

Yet another reason I love Seattle!
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wenchymcwench:


We enter a little coffeehouse with a friend of mine and give our order. While we’re aproaching our table two people come in and they go to the counter: ‘Five coffees, please. Two of them for us and three suspended’ They pay for their order, take the two and leave.  I ask my friend: “What are those ‘suspended’ coffees?” My friend: “Wait for it and you will see.” Some more people enter. Two girls ask for one coffee each, pay and go. The next order was for seven coffees and it was made by three lawyers - three for them and four ‘suspended’. While I still wonder what’s the deal with those ‘suspended’ coffees I enjoy the sunny weather and the beautiful view towards the square infront of the café. Suddenly a man dressed in shabby clothes who looks like a beggar comes in throught the door and kindly asks ‘Do you have a suspended coffee ?’ It’s simple - people pay in advance for a coffee meant for someone who can not afford a warm bevarage. The tradition with the suspended coffees started in Naples, but it has spread all over the world and in some places you can order not only a suspended coffee, but also a sandwitch or a whole meal. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have such cafés or even grocery stores in every town where the less fortunate will find hope and support ? If you own a business why don’t you offer it to your clients… I am sure many of them will like it.
 
Source : [x]

I just saw this and thought it would be incredible to share this so maybe it  could catch on whereever you may live
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skeptictothesky:

An anthropologist put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the children of an African tribe that whoever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run, they all took each other’s hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats. When he asked them why they had ran like that when one could have all the fruits for himself they said, “Ubuntu, how can one of us be happy if all the other ones are sad?”
Ubuntu in the Xhosa culture means “I am because we are.”
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butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
butts-with-bro-shades:

deancasotp:

pigeonloki:


The Invisible War 
Since 2006, more than 95,000 service members have been sexually assaulted in the U.S. military
More than 86% of service members do not report their assault
Less than five percent of all sexual assaults are put forward for prosecution, and less than a third of those cases result in imprisonment


I hate that I can attest to accuracy of this post. I never reported my assailants. I had a friend who did. She got looked down upon, name called, moved to a crappy shift and generally treated like trash from a good number of people in our command, including some superiors. The male who molested her got a “talking” to, a slap on his wrist and then essentially promoted. And that was on shore. I can’t even begin to tell you what happened while we were on the ship. It’s just unbelievably horrifying. 

Can I fucking tell you how true this is???? Even though I did report the shit dick that did this to me; OSI treated me like I was lying, saying things like “you’re not acting like a victim”, and “this is impossible” when they made me draw out a diagram of what ‘position’ we were in when it happened. My sergeants basically called me out publicly calling me a slut, other airmen called me easy, and the bastard is still enlisted to this day. The most I got was a medical discharge with PTSD and a monthly check that isn’t even half of what I was making a month when I was enlisted. They cover their tracks and slap the assholes on the nose like they’re simply misbehaving pet dogs who pissed on your carpet. 
God fucking bless the USA. 
N.Korean defectors struggle to fit into S.Korean life
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